Why Cancer?

From the first days of my time in the Science Research Program, I began reading article after article about anything remotely biological, without focus on any particular field. I dove into researching the effects of toxins in plastics, birth defects, Down syndrome, Hemophilia and anything else that looked appealing from the title of an article.

As time progressed, I came up with the idea of studying how chemicals like BPA affect fetal development, but quickly became bored. One day in class, after scrolling through a science news site, I found a study that used nanodiamonds to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs.

That single article led me to question everything I knew about cancer. I did not originally want to research a disease from personal connection but I found motivation from cancer research to continue learning. Since there are over 200 types of cancer, the most resistant cases will always struggle to find a valuable treatment option. It was the statistic proof that even cancers like breast cancer, which is most often surgical, can be treated with chemotherapy only successfully 1.5% of the time.

The resistance to treatment is what makes cancer so difficult, and finding new, unique ways to target the resistance-promoting factors is what I believe to be the future of cancer research. Any progress in this field that I can contribute to would be an immense success, as the creation of a single drug may help, even at first, dozens of patients survive longer than they might normally, which would be incredible.

Thanks,

Jennifer

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